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Firewood Crate Rename

Firewood Crate Rename

At White Horse Energy, we’ve realised that there is the potential for a lot of confusion when our customers are trying to compare crates of wood from different suppliers…

If you try and look at crate proportions, you’ll start trying to compare dimensions, internal or external volumes, stacked or loose volumes and very quickly get confused. Similarly, comparing weight is a no-no (wet wood is heavier), as is a number of logs.

The one clear message that has come out of this exercise however, is that majority of our competitor’s crates are consistently smaller than the White Horse Energy!

For that reason we have therefore decided to rename our crates to reflect this position, with our half crates now called Large crates, and our full will change to a Giant crate.

Whatever you call it, the Giant crate has a whopping 2.63m3 loose volume, & we believe Giant Crate is the largest volume of firewood that can be safely delivered in the UK, with prices starting from as little as £200, it’s also the most economical way to purchase large volumes of high quality kiln dried wood.

Don’t delay, buy a Giant crate today!!

Posted: 05/06/2017 13:54:02 by Stuart Woodward | with 0 comments

Summer Price Drop

Summer Price Drop

As spring looks to have sprung early, we have decided to implement our summer prices earlier than usual this year, to offer our customers the most competitive prices in the market.
Ash Firewood Full Crates – Was £235 Now £215
Ash Firewood Half Crates – Was £145 Now £135
Birch Firewood Full Crates – Was £209 Now £200
Birch Firewood Half Crates – Was £135 Now £130
Firepower Full Pallet – Was £228 Now £218
Platinum Plus Full Pallet – Was £245 Now £235

 
Don't delay, either stock up ready for next winter or enjoy in your firepit outside whilst we are having this beautiful weather.
Get yours quick & take advantage of these great prices. Click below to buy now!!!
 

Posted: 02/06/2017 10:05:30 by Stuart Woodward | with 0 comments

Cirencester College Apprenticeship

Cirencester College Apprenticeship

For the past two weeks, Matthew Lecras of Cirencester College has completed an internship within our business.  Whilst we have provided Matthew with some work experience and hands on knowledge and understanding of how a SME operates, he has responded with energy, enthusiasm and a good work ethic.  We'd recommend all businesses out there to develop links with your local community and actively bring in students for internship - you'll be surprised by how much they can contribute, and might even be a future employee in the making!

 

Posted: 02/06/2017 10:01:10 by Stuart Woodward | with 0 comments

NEW PRODUCT - FastBlaze


NEW PRODUCT - FastBlaze

White Horse Energy has just created a new standard for kindling. Whereas most kindling is currently very poor quality with small bits of softwood, recycled architraves and the like - our kindling is generated from the offcuts of our kiln dried hardwood and so of very good quality.

Fast Blaze kindling is small enough for any stove, but chucky enough to burn hotter & longer! Will light with very little assistance and provide the perfect start for any fire.


Our Fast Blaze is now available to be added on to your firewood orders, & with the add on feature you'll fully be able customise your order best for your burning needs. This is the perfect add on for your next firewood purchase & shouldn’t be missed.

 

Posted: 06/04/2017 10:59:51 by Stuart Woodward | with 0 comments

Wood Pellets Can’t Be Carbon Neutral, Can They?

Wood Pellets Can’t Be Carbon Neutral, Can They?

Once again wood pellets seem to be on the receiving end of some rather poor press this week, with The Times declaring that they are only considered ‘carbon neutral’ due to a ‘loop hole’ in EU law[1]. There are a couple of scorching lines in the article, including an assertion that “ministers [made] false assumption[s]” about the carbon neutral nature of wood pellets. Concluding that wood pellets are not a “genuine carbon neutral [technology]” and thus it is “ridiculous” that wood pellets receive the same sort of subsidies as these genuine technologies.

It appears that Mr Brack – the fellow who wrote the report quoted in the Times – is basing his argument on the fact that if one chops a tree down and burns it, it releases carbon into the atmosphere, and that simply planting a tree at the same time you chopped one down doesn’t count because it’ll take ages for that new tree to absorb the carbon released by burning the first one. Even if that is the right way to look at this (it’s not), I’m still not sure that his case stands up. So, for the layman (with the odd simplification), lets run through how this works in practise:


You own a forest. It’s a small forest, it’s only got 20 trees in it. They’re all different ages too. There’s a 1-year-old tree, a 2-year-old tree, and so on right up to the oldest and biggest tree that’s 20-years-old. At the end of the year you chop down the 20-year-old tree and burn it. It releases 1 tree’s worth of carbon back into the atmosphere. You also plant a new sapling. At the end of the following year, you’ve got 20 trees again. There’s a 1-year old tree …. Between them those 20 trees have absorbed 1 tree’s worth of carbon from the atmosphere. 


This is the basis of the ‘carbon neutral’ nature of wood pellets. 


“Aha” you might exclaim, “but it takes a whole year to absorb the carbon from the tree that you burnt in one day!” 

Oh dear. The above is an example. The reality is that forests and woodland are continuously managed, with trees being planted and harvested constantly, and so the consumption and release of carbon from the atmosphere is pretty much neutral – hence the term.

“What about those unscrupulous companies clear felling acre after acre of forest and not replanting them?”


Interestingly, the wood pellet industry is stopping exactly that scenario from happening. Wood pellets in the UK go through an incredibly laborious sustainability certification scheme to ensure that they do not come from anywhere with unsustainable forestry practices. While unsustainable pellets probably exist somewhere, there isn’t anywhere else in the world that checks the sustainability of regulated pellets as laboriously as the UK.

In 2013 the US consumed 63.6 million tonnes of wood less than it did in 2003[2]. Part of this is due to the cyclical nature of wood consumption – but a large part of this is down to the digital revolution. I’m assuming you’re reading this on a screen and not on paper? 

Making sure that forests have a ‘job’ is an important part of ensuring their continued existence. If the land currently forested can’t deliver its owners a yield, a natural consequence would be that land being put to a different use – we’d call that deforestation. Thus the use of wood pellets ought to be viewed as an important positive influence on the environment from both a carbon and forest perspective. Those seeking to portray wood pellets as carbon spewing harbingers of doom need to find a clue, fast.



Stuart Fitzgerald

Managing Director

White Horse Energy



[1] http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/450m-lost-over-failed-green-power-programme-n7hf0h6ht


[2] https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/fplrp/fpl_rp679.pdf 
Posted: 23/02/2017 16:58:36 by Stuart Fitzgerald | with 0 comments